It Only Takes Three Steps to Start Something Extraordinary

Three Steps to Start Something Extraordinary

Continued from a Q&A session with Community Engagement Team, KBH, Krista, and Colby share how they found ways to keep focused on the important (i.e. starting a habit). 

KBH: I would say it is particularly helpful to make sure that what we say is a priority is truly important to us. That it is something important enough that we are willing – even excited – to put the work necessary into creating a meaningful habit. Perhaps, then, the distractions of life won’t be nearly as appealing as the path to accomplishing our new habit.

Krista: Recognize that life doesn’t always go as planned, but use your struggles as a means to achieve more. Make sure that you feel joy when you think about your life, and if you don’t, then find what makes you joyful and make that a priority.

Colby: Ask yourself, “What if I did a today, which could lead to b that then lead to c, d, and e. Or that uncovered the possibility of 2 and 3?” What I’m trying to convey is that you never know where your journey will take you, but think of where your journey can take you. It only takes one step and there is no need to rush into it, go at your own pace.

Are you inspired to pick a habit and weave it into your routine? (Hey, us too!) Follow these three steps to kick start a life of integrity with a new habit!

Catalyst is designed as a one-day learning experience where participants develop their own authentic path, connect to groups and causes they care about, and commit to a plan to be a person who sparks possibility. Part of that plan is designed so participants  understand how the habits they create can help them author their future leadership story, and below are some steps to begin your own leadership story.

Get Inspired
Get Inspired
It’s time to dream a little, look at some ideas, consider your needs and decide what starting something extraordinary means to you.  The image below is made to give you an overview of some of the possibilities but there is so much more. Or if you would like some advice, read over this blog on “Our Valuable Time”

Craft Your Habit


Craft Your Habit

Crafting your habit is when your dreams and ideas take shape. Use sticky notes, colored pens, or other fun office supplies to start planning how you will act on your habit. You can find more ideas and inspiration on our Pinterest page.

Believe in yourself

 

Believe in Yourself 
When you’re satisfied with crafting your habit, it’s time to start something extraordinary. It can be daunting at first, but trust (and believe) in yourself. When you find yourself struggling, revisit the reason(s) why you started. The possibility of living a life of integrity is right at your fingertips! 

 

What habit will you commit to trying for 30 days?

IMG_1823IMG_1824

 

 

Trying Something for 30 Days: Q&A session with Community Engagement Team

Earlier this year, our Community Engagement Team dove headfirst into our Catalyst™ program to tackle an exercise on building a habit.  Catalyst™ is a one-day experience focused on learning to develop your own authentic path, connect to groups and causes you care about, and commit to a plan to be a catalyst for yourself and the groups you’re part of. The trio of KBH (Vice President), Krista (intern), and Colby (intern) selected a habit to add to their routine for 30 days in April. Find out how they did with Trying Something for 30 Days:

Which habit did you select to Try Something For 30 Days?

KBH: Spend 5 minutes mentally reliving a happy moment, including as much detail as I can remember.

Krista: Take 30 minutes every day working toward finding your life passion.

Colby: When you feel stressed during the day, make yourself stop for 5 minutes to identify the source of stress

IMG_1493What was it like to develop your habit over 30 days? Could you give an example of one activity or exercise that you did because of your habit?

KBH: This habit brought a bit of cheer to my days. It was helpful on days that felt heavy because I had something to remind me that life is both heaviness and lightness.  

Krista: This habit helped me figure out where my true passions lie. I would brainstorm on what truly made me happy, and find different ways to create a career out of that.

Colby: One activity I did for this habit was to work backwards from the stressor that I was currently experiencing or experienced in the past. I started with questions with simple questions of “What emotion were you feeling when (insert experience here)?” and progressed towards answering the question of “Why?” and “What did I learn from the experience?” It was a treat to take a step back once the 30 days was complete and see how the actions I took towards the habit evolved.

How did you motivate yourself to continue your habit each day?  How did you hold yourself accountable?

KBH: I went old-school with my accountability strategy – a post-it note on my computer monitor! The feelings from reflecting on a memory that brought me joy was a motivating factor for me. I found it to be uplifting to recall happy and positive times from my life.   

Krista: I used my impending graduation as motivation to continue working toward my habit of finding my passion. I set aside time each week to focus on what I love to do and since I would be needing to get a job after graduation, I used that to hold myself accountable on this habit.

Colby: I’ll be candid, developing this habit over 30 days was brutal at first. I kept forgetting to do it, but once I started, thoughts kept pouring out and words seamlessly appeared on the page. I wrote post-it notes of the emotion I was feeling while doing the habit and looked at them when I needed a boost of motivation.

IMG_1495In the Catalyst program, we ask participants to consider what they want their future leadership story to say about them, while understanding how the habits we create can help us author that story. Could you talk about how your habit  specifically help to realize the intentions and achievements in your leadership story?

KBH: I want to be someone others see as being able to move through life, even the challenging bits, with a sense of hope. One way I harness a feeling of hope is by recalling the times in life that were happy and meaningful. By creating a habit that centered around these memories, I think they will be easier to recall in times of struggle.

Krista: I feel like knowing where my true passions are will help me be the best leader I can. If I am able to use my talents to my full potential, then I will better lead others on their journey to finding their passion.

Colby: In hindsight, this habit helped me to look at previous experiences with a new lens, one that helped me to better understand myself. I will also add that this habit helped me to connect the dots of the puzzle that is my leadership story – the entire puzzle has yet to be finished (it’s a continual work in progress)!

Are you inspired to pick a habit and weave it into your routine? (Hey, us too!) Come back in a few days to learn how to kick start a life of integrity in three steps.

Friday 5: Meaningful Friendships

Hello everyone! It’s Krista, one of LeaderShape’s Community Engagement Interns. Today we’re talking about friendships. In my 22 years of life, I have definitely struggled with making quality friendships. People can be tricky to read and it can be hard to know who to let into your inner circle. I have been terrified to open up to new people in fear of them leaving me for other friends, but it’s important to put yourself out there. You will meet your forever friends, trust me! You just have to give yourself permission to let it happen.

Yes, good friends can be hard to come by, but you will find them. Sometimes it just takes a little patience. Here are a few of the ways I have found that are essential in creating and maintaining meaningful friendships — & keeping them strong as ever!

Let yourself be vulnerable, trust is key.

Being vulnerable can be difficult. It’s hard to find people you know you can trust to open up to, but it’s so important to have those people in your life. Vulnerability is something a lot of people like to avoid, though surface level relationships are not sustainable in the long run. You need people you can trust to talk about the things that really matter. Being vulnerable takes practice, but once you’re able to do it well with friends you can trust, then you’ve got yourself a strong friendship that will last.

“The best proof of love is trust.” -Joyce Brothers

Give each other space when it’s needed.

Sometimes you just need time to be alone, and that’s okay. Space can give you room to breathe and that can actually create stronger relationships with those in your life. Being alone gives you time to gain a better understanding of who you are as a person, as well as who you need to surround yourself with for a more fulfilling life. Just be respectful about your need to be alone for a little while; let your friends know in a clear way – so they know you aren’t avoiding them, but you really just need personal time to grow.

“I think it’s very healthy to spend time alone. You need to know how to be alone and not be defined by another person.” -Olivia Wilde

Remember to create time for one another.

Life can get busy. It’s inevitable, but it’s important to not forget about your friendships amongst the chaos of life. Make time for each other, even when it seems like you have no time at all. This can seem especially hard when it’s a long distance friendship, but there are a few ways to easily make time for the people that matter. It would be best to find time to meet in person, but if you can’t do that, try to call them or video chat. Don’t always rely on social media. Social media is can be an amazing way to keep in touch with friends and family, but people can often use social media in a way that can hinder relationships instead of cultivating growth.

“No distance of place or lapse of time can lessen the friendship of those who are thoroughly persuaded of each other’s worth.” -Robert Southey

Make each other smile.

Friendship is built on people that can make you smile even on your darkest days, so making your friend feel safe enough to talk about those feelings, but also be able to help them forget about it for a little while. Remember the little things your friends love to show you care. Put effort into your relationships, and prove that you truly care about those who mean the most to you.

“Share your smile with the world. It’s a symbol of friendship and peace.” -Christie Brinkley

Be upfront and honest.

They say honesty is the best policy, and it really is true. If you have an issue with a friend, it’s best to just be upfront with them. It will cause less stress in the long run, plus many times people don’t even pick up on your potential hints of anger. Just ask your friend to sit down and talk with you about the problem as soon as possible after it happens. Being passive aggressive about something rarely every solves the problem, it just makes everything worse. Dishonesty in a friendship ruins trust and a lack of trust could end the relationship once and for all. Just remember to be kind-hearted in your honesty — do not intentionally hurt others with your words. Remember that mind-reading doesn’t exist, so you’ll need to actually tell your friends what is on your mind to solve the problem. Trust is the foundation for a meaningful relationship — honesty allows for love.

“Honest communication is built on truth and integrity and upon respect of the one for the other.” -Benjamin E. Mays

 

Krista Lindwall is a Community Engagement Intern at LeaderShape. A recent graduate of Marquette University, Krista loves creating excessive amounts of Spotify playlists, making memories with family and friends, adventuring around her city and beyond, drinking copious cups of peppermint tea, and learning to become a social justice warrior in her community. Follow Krista on Twitter at @krista_lindwall.

“Be fearless in the pursuit of what sets your soul on fire.”